The Case for Organic Cotton

Written by Abby Wilson

I’ll admit it. For years now I’ve been all about organic berries, eco-friendly cleaning sprays, and cruelty-free beauty products. I’ve tried to bike more and drive less—especially on Ozone Alert Action Days. I’ve spent hour upon hour watching food documentaries that drive me to buy dollar upon dollar of “clean 15” produce to properly fuel my family.

All this, yet, I’d casually pop into the Targets and Gaps of the world to load up on mass-produced clothing made with conventional cotton—the world’s dirtiest crop. I’d dress my babies in clothing treated with toxic heavy metals. I could actually smell the chemicals but thought they’d be okay as long as I washed everything first.

It feels a little bit dirty (pun intended). Like only recycling when someone is watching you. Why did I feel like it was okay to so selectively feed my family all organic yet not wrap their perfectly soft baby skin in the same standard of care? That skin, mind you, that is actually their precious bodies’ biggest organ.

This was all before I got to know
Pact. Not only is their clothing stylish, affordable, and accessible, they’re also committed to creating it using only the best, 100 percent organic cotton. Pact partners with the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS)—which is recognized as the gold standard in sustainable textile processing—to certify their entire supply chain.

And harmful chemicals aside, organic cotton minimizes impact on the environment and
improves the quality of life for people who make the clothing. It doesn’t damage the soil, has less impact on the air, and uses 71 percent less water and 62 percent less energy than conventional cotton.

Pact has made it possible for me to be all in on this organic lifestyle. For myself, for my husband, and for my kids. It’s no longer just grass-fed beef and non-toxic cleaning products in my house. It’s super-soft undies and sustainable basics that only organic cotton can create. It’s all organic, all the time. Pact is the guilt-free fashion brand I can get behind.

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